Emerging Tech

Inoculating our broken infrastructure

University of Newcastle researchers may have come up with a biotechnology answer to the roadway printer I posted about yesterday: bacteria modified to colonize cracks in concrete and fix ruined buildings and crumbling roadways.

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Printing out the orbital infrastructure

3-D printing is going viral. With 3-D fabrication technology at for the desktop, for LEGOs, and for nanoscale materials, it was only a matter of time before the paradigm found its way into spaceand corporate science fiction. But this promising technology still has to prove itself in terrestrial infrastructure first.

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App pitch: coffeehouse commons

Coffee isn't only a stimulant, but also a social glue and fuel for creative lives. A proposed mobile app would allow caffeinated bloggers, writers, artists, and designers to share their coffeehouse-generated work in real-time.

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The expanding Kinectosphere

Kinect hacks are emerging at a rapid pace; its hard to recall a mass-market gadget so quickly adapted to new uses. As Bruce Sterling points out, Microsoft accidentally invented a primo piece of art-installation hardware. It's this kind of DIY innovation that keeps tech feral.

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Sex-crazed cyborg-moth mind control!

Scientists at Tokyo Tech have tapped into the neurons of a male silk moth, connecting its tiny brain to a little wheeled robot. When the moths sense organs are exposed to female pheremones, the robot performs the silk moths mating dance.

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Green endurance: electric race car goes the distance

The SRZero goes from 0 to 60 in fewer than seven seconds. But this power doesnt come from stepping on the gasthe race-ready automobile runs on electricity. And in a coup for green technology, tomorrow the car will reach Ushuaia, Argentina and the end of a 16,000-mile journey from Prudhoe Bay in Alaska.

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To Facebook you are simple, seamless, and informal

Talking about the new Facebook mail system at todays live event, Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook director of engineering Andrew Boz Bosworth keep using words like simple, seamless, and informal. But does the new system promote a dumbed-down version of sociability?

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